News

05/21/2020 –  Cases of COVID-19 Confirmed in Osceola County

Osceola Community Health Services continues to respond to COVID-19.  As of Thursday, May 21, there are 30 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Osceola County. 22 of the 30 cases have recovered. The active cases are:

1 adult Male, (41-60 years)

1 adult Male, (41-60 years)

1 adult Female, (41-60 years)

1 adult Male, (18-40 years)

1 adult Female, (61-80 years)

1 adult Male, (61-80 years)

1 adult Female, (18-40 years)

1 adult Male, (61-80 years)

The Osceola Community Health Services continues to work closely with the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH), and other state and local partners to respond to this ongoing pandemic.

For more COVID-19 prevention information including case counts in Iowa see: https://coronavirus.iowa.gov/#prevention

05/08/2020 –  Cases of COVID-19 Confirmed in Osceola County

Osceola Community Health Services continues to respond to COVID-19.  As of Friday, May 8, there are 18 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Osceola County.  11 of the 18 cases have recovered. The active cases are:

1 Adult Female, (18-40 years)

1 Adult Male, (41-60 years)

1 Adult Male, (18-40 years)

1 Adult Male, (41-60 years)

1 Adult Male, (41-60 years)

1 Adult Female, (41-60 years)

1 Adult Female, (41-60 years)

The Osceola Community Health Services continues to work closely with the Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH), and other state and local partners to respond to this ongoing pandemic.

For more COVID-19 prevention information including case counts in Iowa see: https://coronavirus.iowa.gov/#prevention

Second Case of COVID-19 Confirmed in Osceola County

First Case of COVID-19 Confirmed in Osceola County

Osceola Community Hospital creates $16,041,706 Impact on Local Economy.

Osceola Community Hospital is now Osceola Regional Health Center. 

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Health Fact

High blood pressure greatly increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. If your blood pressure is below 120/80 mm Hg, be sure to get it checked at least once every two years, starting at age 20. If your blood pressure is higher, your doctor may want to check it more often.